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HARRY M. ROSE 




ELVIN A. KABAT 



2Wi 



ication 



Teaching is the essence of a medical school. No one disputes the ideal 
of the teacher; student and faculty both share it. Yet, in practice, faculty 
needs for research, practice and publication; student frustration and apathy; 
and the demands of a swollen curriculum combine to distort the student- 
teacher relationship. 

When, however, faculty and students do interact in a creative learning 
experience, both are inspired. In this process we not only learn, but seem to 
grow. The ideal is revitalized. 

Two preclinical professors, whose concern for teaching was constant, 
exemplified this ideal. They taught us a critical approach to medicine which 
involved mobilizing our minds rather than our notes. It is to them that we 
dedicate, with gratitude, this Yearbook of the Class of 1965: 



<_• (vim ^/i. <J\. a /' a f 



1o OL (Z/ ass Of 1965 



I am particularly happy to be able to address the Class of 1965 on this oc- 
casion, since the current academic year is my twenty-fifth on the Faculty. More- 
over, it is the first year in which I have taken sabbatical leave and I cannot be 
held officially responsible for anything said here, since this brief note was written 
before the period of leave ended. 

Temporary retirement from the teaching program was an interesting experi- 
ence. It brought to my attention, more vividly than ever before, the immense bene- 
fit that teaching brings to the teacher himself. It is he, of course, rather than the 
student, who gains most from their association, in part because the teacher must 
attempt to focus his attention fully and accurately on all aspects of his subject, 
and equally because he is brought into challenging contact with a large group of 
inquiring young minds that never get older and never lose their enthusiasm or 
vigor. In considering many of the relationships between faculty and students, I 
was reminded again that "doctor" really means "teacher" and I was hard put to 
decide just who teaches whom. 

Having more time in which to read and to work again at the laboratory bench, 
I consequently had a greater opportunity to worry about the deluge of new in- 
formation in all areas of medicine, but I also remembered what Oliver Wendell 
Holmes had to say about the uselessness of "inert facts," as well as Whitehead's 
classic remark that "knowledge keeps no better than fish." In this latter connection, 
I could not restrain the thought that the teaching machine is a dangerous snare — 
almost as dangerous, in fact, as its human counterpart who believes that the direct 
transplantation of facts or techniques is his chief function. 

I mused, too, once more about the relation between science and medicine and 
could not avoid the conclusion that a good deal of so-called medical science is un- 
avoidably nothing more than medical technology, rooted in empiricism. "Unavoid- 
ably," because the scientific method can be applied to medicine — or anything else 
for that matter — only in so far as the imaginative hypothesis can be tested by ac- 
curate observation or controlled experiment. The key word here, of course, is 
imagination, which undergirds the art, the science, the practice and the future of 
medicine. 

I can only hope that the Class will enter its professional life with the healthy 
skepticism which is the hallmark of the scientific attitude, that it will consider 
graduation only the beginning of a life-long education, and that many of its mem- 
bers will contribute to the lasting verity of Whitehead's epigram. 

Ham' M. Rose 



sL-ao«i'ngi J-oreward — ^/ina Jjach 



The P&S Class of 1965 will be actively engaged in the practice of medicine 
in the year 2000. Indeed, most of you will have attained the position of elder 
Statesman in whatever area of medicine you have chosen to specialize. Most of 
you will have stopped the rigorous study associated with formal education at the 
end of medical school, internships or residencies. Further education will then be- 
come largely a spare time activity. The constant effort required to keep up with 
developments in basic medical sciences, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, 
Pathology, will not be possible — indeed it is not possible even for the basic 
scientists. Yet one must continue to be receptive to developments and to learn and 
maintain fluency in understanding and appreciation of the currents of medical 
research. Think for a moment of the P&S Class of 1930, most of whom are in the 
same stage of their medical careers that you will be in the year 2000. Did they 
have to keep up with their basic medical science? What was chemotherapy like 
in 1930 — salvarsan, tryparsamide, and quinine. What was blood transfusion like 
— A, B, O and AB. What was gamma globulin? How many hormones were there? 
How many hemoglobins! How many vitamins! What did nucleic acid mean to the 
Class of 1930 or for that matter to its professors? What was a suitable plasma 
volume expander — an autoimmune disease? In short, would we be happy to be 
treated today by the top man in the Class of 1930 if he had not kept up? 

No one can foresee the advances to come during the last third of this century. 
The principles of the scientific method, the ability to analyze and evaluate data — 
the understanding of how scientific concepts evolve — these tools, if their cutting 
edges are kept keen, help us to keep up. It is this that one endeavors to teach in 
basic sciences. The student, however, does not always see it that way — he is 
anxious to get on to treating the patient. This was no less true for the Class of 
1930 than for the Class of 1965. The teachers in the medical sciences stand to the 
student in the same relationship as the boy scouts who were doing their good deed 
by helping an old woman across the street — it was harder because she didn't want 
to go. 

Elvin A. Kabat 




<J he \*—^/ass of 

1965 



11 




ROBERTA ABELSON 
KIRCH 

A.B., Cornell, 1961 

585 McLean' Ave. 

Yonkers, NY. 

Radiology 

BOSTON CITY HOSPITAL 

PATHOLOGY DIVISION 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



STEPHAN M. BERGER 

A.B., Princeton, 1961 

7755 Cedar Brook St. 

Philadelphia 50, Pa. 

Medicine 

ALBERT EINSTEIN MEDICAL 

CENTER 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 





HARRY A. ACKLEY 
A.B., Franklin and 
Marshall, 1961 
36 Kendal Ave. 
Maplewood, N.J. 
Medicine 

SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL 

HOSPITAL 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



DONALD R. BERGSMA 

A.B., Calvin, 1961 

98 Suncrest Ave. 

North Haledon, N.J. 

Ophthalmology 

STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 

HOSPITALS 

IOWA CITY, IOW.X 





ROBERT D. BACH 

A.B., Princeton, 1960 
128 Edmunds Road 
Wellesley, Mass. 
Surgery 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 



VIRGINIA BIDDLE 

Briareliff 

Cove Road 

Oyster Bay L.I., NX 

Medicine 

ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




12 




JOHN P. BLASS 
A.B., Harvard, 1958 
Ph.D., London, 1960 
3950 Blackstone Ave. 
Bronx 71, N.Y. 
Medicine 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERA!. 

HOSPITAL 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



■ Hi 



JAMES J. BRANSCOM, JR. 

A.B., Stanford, 1961 

9 Littlewood Drive 

Piedmont, Calif. 

Medicine 

SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL 

HOSPITAL 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



AVRUM ZVI BLUMING 
A.B., Columbia, 1961 
1416 N. Havenhurst Drive 
Hollywood 28, Calif. 
Medicine 

EELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 
1ST COLUMBIA MEDICAL DIV. 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



ABRAHAM A. BRIDGER 

A.B., Yale, 1959 

930 East Fourth Walk 

New York 9, N.Y. 

Psychiatry 

GREENWICH HOSPITAL 

GREENWICK, CONNECTICUTT 






ROBERT F. BOHNEN 
A.B., Syracuse, 1961 
113 Holland Ave. 
Albany 8. N. Y. 
Medicine 

BUFFALO GENERAL HOSPITAL 
BUFFALO, NEW YORK 



DONALD J. BROCK 

A.B.,Yale, 1961 

1066 Calvin Ave. 

Buffalo 23, N. Y. 

Medicine 

St. luke's hospital 

new york, new york 




life 



13 




H. KEITH H. BRODIE 

A.B., Princeton, 1961 

Rosebrook Road 

New Canaan, Conn. 

Psychiatry 

OCHSNER FOUNDATION 

HOSPITAL 

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 



HARVEY W. CAPLAN 

A.B., Swarthmore, 1961 

727 Plymouth Lane 

Ellwood City, Pa. 

Medicine 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF 

CLEVELAND 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 





NORMAN D. BROWN 
A.B., Princeton, 1961 
134 Haven Ave. 
New York 32, N. Y. 
Nemo-Surgery 

MOLTNT SINAI HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



ROBERT V. CARIDA 

A.B., Rutgers, 1961 

43 1 Abington Ave. 

Bloomfield, N. J. 

Obstetrics 

ST. Vincent's hospital 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





DANIEL C. BRYANT 
A.B., Princeton, 1961 
I Cypress Garden 
Cincinnati 20, Ohio 
Medicine 

BARNES HOSPITAL 
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



WILLIAM B. CASKEY 

A.B., Franklin and 

Marshall, 1961 

2257 Rudy Road 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Medicine 

JEFFERSON MEDICAL COLLEGE 

HOSPITAL 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSLYVANIA 




14 




JAMES R. COLE 
A.B., Princeton, 1961 
169 Bryant St. 
Buffalo 22, N. Y. 
Medicine 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS 
OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA. 



JAMES E. CULVER, JR. 

A.B., Dartmouth, 1960 

408 Laws St. 

Bridgeville, Dela. 

Surgery 

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA 

HOSPITAL 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA 





JAMES |. CONDON 
A.B., Cornell, 1961 
480 Riverdale Ave. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
Psychiatry 

GREENWICH HOSPITAL 
GREENWICH, CONNECTICUT 



WILLIAM J. DAVIS 

A.B., Wilkes, 1961 

199 V 2 So. Wyoming St. 

Hazleton, Pa. 

Medicine 

EELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 

1ST COLUMBIA MEDICAL DIV. 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





THOMAS S. COTTRELL 
■A.B., Brown, 1965 
120 Haven Ave. 
New York, N. Y. 10032 
Pathology 

TRAINEE IN PATHOLOGY 
PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL, 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



THOMAS L. DELBANCO 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

221 Barnard Rd. 

Larchmont, N. Y. 

Medicine 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 

1ST COLUMBIA MEDICAL DTV. 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




15 




PATRICK A. DOWLING 
A.B., Dartmouth, 1962 
M.S., Dartmouth, 1963 
1615 WacherRd. 
Glenview, 111. 
Psychiatry 

MAINE MEDICAL CENTER 
PORTLAND, MAINE 



STEPHEN FALK 

A.B., Princeton, 1961 

4527 Bedford Ave. 

Brooklyn 35, N. Y. 

OB-Gyn 

MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





Z. MARIAN DRESCHER 
A.B., Hunter, 1961 
B.E.C. Dept. of Labor 
305 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco 2, Calif. 
Pediatrics 

ERONX MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



JAMES W. FAULK 

A.B., Rochester, 1961 

155 Myrtle St. 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Medicine 

BUFFALO GENERAL HOSPITAL 
BUFFALO, NEW YORK 





RICHARD N. EDIE 
A.B., Princeton, 1959 
1 5 Northview Place 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
Surgery 

ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



NORMAN M. 

FINKELSTEIN 
A.B., Yale, 1961 
45 Sutton Place 

New York, N. Y. 
Surgery 

MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK. NEW YORK 




16 




BRUCE M. FORESTER 
A.B., Dartmouth, 1960 
1 124 E. 27th St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Medicine 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 
1ST COLUMBIA MEDICAL DIV. 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



MICHAEL L. GLENN 

A.B., Princeton, 1959 

Harvard, 1960 

615 W. 164 St. 

New York 32, N. Y. 

Psychiatry 

BRONX MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 

NEW YORK, NEW Y'ORK 





OSCAR B. GARFEIN 
A.B., Columbia, 1961 
172 East 4th St. 
New York 3, N. Y. 
Medicine 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



BRUCE N. GOLDREYER 

A.B., Amherst, 1961 

143-50 Hoover Ave. 

Jamaica, N. Y. 

Medicine 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW Y'ORK 





HOWARD N. GINSBURG 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

200 Brookline St. 

Newton 59. Mass. 

Surgery 

BETH ISRAEL HOSPITAL 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



JOHN 7 G.GREGORY 

A.B., Princeton, 1960 

734 Beacon Lane 

Marion, Pa. 

Orthopedic Surgery 

ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL 
MONTREAL. QUE., CANADA 




17 



I 






ASHLEY T. HAASE 
A3., Lawrence, 1961 
Box 97-A 
Crystal Lake, 111. 
Medicine 

JOHNS HOPKINS HOSPITAL 
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




PAUL M. HAMADA 

A.B., Yale, 1961 

64 Irving Place 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Medicine 

BRONX MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





JOHN W. HADDEN 
A.B., Yale, 1961 
Harbor Road 
Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y. 

Medicine 

ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



SUSAN RUTH HARRIS 

A.B., Michigan, 1961 

131 East 92nd St. 

New York 28, N. Y. 

Psychiatry 

SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL 

HOSPITAL 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 





STANTON D. HALE 
A.B., Princeton, 1959 
Pacific Mutual Bldg. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Surgery 

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO 
MEDICAL CENTER 
DENVER, COLORADO 



PHILIP HERTZ 

A.B.,Corne\\, 1961 

261 Clinton St. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Medicine 

HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 




18 




ANTHONY H. HORAN 

A.B., Dartmouth, 1961 

179 E. 70th St. 

New York, N. Y. 10021 

Medicine 

st. luke's hospital 

new york, new york 



ERIC H. JOHNSON 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

2717 Boston Ave. 

Muskogee, Okla. 

Orthopedic Sxirgery 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL 

HOSPITAL 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 





MICHAEL D. ISEMAN 
A.B., Princeton, 1961 
435 W. 21st St. 

Fremont, Nebr. 
A ledicine 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 
1ST COLUMBIA MEDICAL DIV. 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



JOHN J. KEYSER 

A.B., Princeton, 1961 

309 N. Edison St. 

Arlington 3, Va. 

Surgery 

ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





WILLIAM A. JAMES, JR. 

A.B., Princeton, 1960 

518 South 28th St. 

Humboldt, Tenn. 

Medicine 

NORTH CAROLINA MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

CHAPEL HILL, N. C. 



DANIEL F. KRIPKE 

40 Rock Spring Ave. 

West Orange, N. J. 

Psychiatry 

BRONX MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




19 



m^" 




CHARLES R. KUEHNER 
S.B., M.I.T., 1958 

52 Mayfield Ave. 

Fort Thomas, Kentucky 

Surgery 

st. luke's hospital 

new york, new york 



BRENT W. LAMBERT 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

76 DeBelle Drive 

Atherton, Calif. 

Ophthalmology 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

HOSPITALS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 





STEPHEN B. KURTIN 
A.B., Princeton, 1961 
4547 Livington Ave. 
New York 71.N.Y. 
Medicine 

MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



DOROTHY SPIEGEL 

LANE 

A.B., Vassar, 1961 

480 Ninth St. 

Brooklyn 15, N.Y. 

Public Health 

BETH ISRAEL HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK NEW YORK 





DARWIN R LABARTHE 
A.K, Princeton, 1961 
2969 Kala Kawa Ave. 
Honolulu, Hawaii 
Medicine 

BARNES HOSPITAL 
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 



NIKOLAUS D. LANGLOH 

A.B., Columbia, 1960 

To blerst rasse 82 

Zurich, Switzerland 

Orthopedics 

PRESBYTERIAN MEDICAL 

CENTER 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




20 




KEAT-JIN LEE 
A.B., Harvard, 1961 
14 China St. 
Penang, Malaya 
Surgery 

ST. LUKES HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



GEORGE B. 

LONGSTRETH, III 

A.B., Yak, 1961 

890 Burr St. 

Fairfield, Conn. 

Surgery 

ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





JAY A. LEVY 

A.B., Wesleyan, 1960 

206 Rowland Park 

Carrcroft 

Wilmington, Dela. 

Medicine 

HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

ANGELO J. LOPANO 

A.B., Fordham, 1961 

252 W. 85th St. 

New York 24, N. Y. 

Surgery 

HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 





ROBERT P. LISAK 
A.B., New York 
University, 1961 
130 East 18th St. 
Brooklyn 26, N. Y. 
Neurology 

MONTEFIORE HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



GEORGE W. 

LUHRMANN, JR. 

S.B..M.1.T., 1956 

M.S., M. 1. T., 1957 

Cedar Brook, N. J. 

Psychiatry 

U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE 




21 



TMI - 


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JOHN P. LYDEN 
A.B., Harvard, 1961 
Rosebrook Road 
New Canaan, Conn. 
Surgery 

ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




ROGER W. MacMILLAN 

B.S., Trinity, 1961 

1721 Athol Road 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

Surgery 

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW 

YORK UPSTATE 

MEDICAL CENTER 

SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 




WILLIAM B. 
McCULLOUGH 
A.B., Whitmore, 1953 
B.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary, 1956 
124 West Altadena Drive 
Altadena, Calif. 
Surgery 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



GEORGE I. MALLIS 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

400 West Broadwav 

Cedarhurst, N. Y. 

Medicine 

BRONX-LEBANON HOSPITAL 

CENTER 

NEW YORK NEW YORK 





WILLIAM A. H. MacLEAN 
B.S., Yale, 1961 
Lloyd Neck 
Huntington L. I., N. Y. 
Medicine 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 
1ST COLUMBIA MEDICAL DIV. 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

WILLIAM D. MATTERN 

A.B., Hamilton, 1961 

4980 Strickler Rd. 

Clarence, N. Y. 

Medicine 

NEW ENGLAND CENTER 

H09PITAL 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




22 




JOHN H. MEREY 
A.B., Union, 1961 
75-02 Austin St. 
Forest Hills 75, N.Y. 
Ophthalmology 

LONG ISLAND COLLEGE 

HOSPITAL 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 



THOMAS M. MURRAY 

A.B., Georgetown, 1961 

5025 Goodridge Ave. 

Bronx, N. Y. 

Obstetrics 

st. Vincent's hospital 

new york, new york 





1. DAVID MILLER 
A.B., Harvard, 1961 
3025 Ocean Ave. 
Brooklyn 35, N. Y. 
Medicine 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 

3rd & 4th (new YORK 

UNIVERSITY) MEDICAL 

DIVISIONS 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



DANIEL A. MYERSON 

B.S., Trinity, 1961 

215 Auburn Rd. 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Radiology 

ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL 

HARTFORD, CONN. 





JAMES K. MOONEY, JR. 
A.B.,Yale, 1961 
112 Sickles Ave. 
New York, N. Y. 
Surgery 

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 
HOSPITAL 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



PAUL J. MYERSON 

B.S., Trinity, 1961 

215 Auburn Rd. 

West Hartford, Conn. 

Radiology 

ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL 
HARTFORD, CONN. 




23 




WILLIAM J. NAPE 
A.B., Johns Hopkins, 1961 
315 Sanford Ave. 
Dunvellen, N. J. 
Psychiatry 

MARY IMOGENE BASSETT 

HOSPITAL 

COOPERSTOWN, NEW YORK 



RICHARD T. O'BRIEN 

'A.B., Columbia, 1961 

3344 Fort Independence St. 

Bronx 63, N. Y. 

Pediatrics 

NORTH CAROLINA MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

CHAPEL HILL, NORTH 

CAROLINA 





ROBERT H. NENNINGER 
A.B., Columbia, 1961 
108 W. 227 St. 
New York 63, N. Y. 
Medicine 

ST. LUKES HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



SUZANNE OP ARIL 

A.B., Cornell, 1961 

Hillcrest Road 

Elraira, N. Y. 

Medicine 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





KENG-YONG NG 
A.B., Stanford, 1961 
"29 Chin Chew St. 
Singapore, Malaya 
Neurology 

MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL 
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



SHIRLEY N.-H. PAN 

A.B., Wellesley, 1961 

903 Tower Court 

Hysan Ave. 

Hong Kong, China 

Medicine 

MARY' IMOGENE BASSETT 

HOSPITAL 

COOPERSTOWN, NEW YORK 




24 




JON S. PEARL 
A.B., Dake, 1961 
350 Bleeker St. Apt. E 
NewYork3,N.Y. 
Trainee in Pathology 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



BARRY F. PORTNOY 

A.B.,NewYork 

University, 1961 

125 Seaman Ave. 

New York 34,' N. Y. 

Medicine 

BRONX MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 

CENTER 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





RICHARD P. PERKINS 
A.B., Hamilton, 1961 
8 First Ave. 
Montpelier, Vt. 
Medicine 

STRONG MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 



RONALD L. PRICE 

A.B.,Oberlin, 1961 

6536 Northumberland St. 

Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 

Ophthalmology 

HEALTH CENTER HOSPITALS 

PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 





LYNN M. PETERSON 
A.B., St. Olaf, 1961 
5652 Newark Ave. 
Chicago 31, 111. 
Surgery 

PETER BENT BRICHAM 

HOSPITAL 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



SANFORD A. RATZAN 

A.B., Hamilton, 1961 

590 Flatbush Ave. 

Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 

Surgery 

st. luke's hospital 

new york, new york 




25 




PAUL C. REDMOND 
B.S., Denison, 1961 
1466 Oakland Ave. 
Columbus, Ohio 
Surgery 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS 
COLUMBUS, .OHIO 



STUART R. ROSE 
A.B., Amherst, 1960 
4520 Delafield Ave. 
New York 71, N.Y. 
Medicine 

SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL 

HOSPITAL 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 





NATHANIEL REICHEK 
A.B., Columbia, 1961 
2191 Bolton St. 
New York 62, N. Y. 
Medicine 

BRONX MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



RONALD K. ST. JOHN 

A.B.,Yale, 1961 

262 Piedmont Rd. RFD #1 

Marietta, Ga. 

Orthopedic Surgery 

HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 





SAMUEL E. ROFMAN 
A.B., Columbia, 1961 
80 Van Cortland Park So. 
New York 63, N.Y. 
Medicine 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 



MICHAEL B. 

SCHACHTER 

A.B., Columbia, 1961 

105 W. 13th St. 

New York 11, N.Y. 

Psychiatry 

HOSPrTAL FOR JOINT DISEASES 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




26 




ROBERT F. SCHREIBER 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

3 1 Fairacres Dr. 

Grosse Pointe Farms 36, Mich. 

Svrgery 

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 

1ST COLUMBIA SURGICAL DIV. 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



CHARLES M. SCIELZO 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

354 Grandview Circle 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Surgery 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 





ELEANORS. SCHUKER 
A.B., Swarthmore, 1961 
108-16 66th Ave. 
Forest Hills 75, N. Y. 
Ophthalmology 
MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW Y'ORK 



MICHAEL G. SHULMAN 

A.B., North Carolina, 1961 

511 A East 28th St. 

Paterson, N. J. 

Medicine 

GRADY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 





DAVIDJ.SCHURMAN 
A.B.,Yale, 1961 
269 Greenbav Road 
Highland Park, 111. 
Medicine 

BEN TAUB GENERAL HOSPITAL 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 



FREDERICK P. SIEGAL 

A.B., Cornell, 1961 

65 E. 96th St. 

New York 28, N. Y. 

Medicine 

MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




27 




BARRY P. SIMMONS 
A.B., Harvard, 1961 
628 Chestnut Hill Ave. 
Brookline, Mass. 
Medicine 

NEW ENGLAND CENTER 

HOSPITAL 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



SAMUEL M. SOBOL 

A.B.,Yale, 1961 

20 W. 77th St. 

New York, N.Y. 

Medicine 

BOSTON CITY HOSPITAL 

V & VI BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 





KENNETH M. SINGER 
S.B., MIT 1961 
555 Timber Lane 
Cookerville, Tenn. 
Surgery 

KING COUNTY HOSPITAL 
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 



THEODORE H. STANLEY 

A.B., Columbia, 1961 

247 Starr St. 

Brooklyn 37, N. Y. 

Surgery 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 





STEPHEN M. SLATON- 
SCHEIDT 

A.B., Princeton, 1960 
150 Riverside Dr. 
New York 24, N. Y. 
Medicine 

MONTEFIORE HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 

RICHARD KNIGHT 

STEEL 

A.B., Yale, 1961 

1200 Fifth Ave. 

New York 29, N.Y. 

Medicine 

NORTH CAROLINA MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 




28 




LAWRENCE Z. STERN 
A.B., Columbia, 1961 
2775 E. 18th St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
A ledicine 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

HOSPITALS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



DAVIDA E. TAYLOR 

A.B., College of the 

Pacific, 1960 

919 San Bonito Road 

Berkeley, Calif. 

Pediatrics 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

HOSPFTAL 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 





DAVID S. SVAHN 
B.S., M.I.T., 1960 
N. Greenwich Rd. 
West New York, N. Y. 
Medicine 

MARY IMOCENE BASSETT 

HOSPITAL 

COOPERSTOWN, NEW YORK 

RICHARD H. 

THOMPSON, JR. 

B.A., Han'ard, 1960 

26 Chestnut St. 

Salem, Mass. 

Surgery 

PALO ALTO-STANFORD HOSPITAL 
PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA 





DIANA G. SYMINGTON 
A.B., Hunter, 1961 
25 Pinewood Lane 
New Hyde Park, N. Y. 
Ob-Gyn. 

LENOX HILL HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK- 



JIM I. URBACH 

A.B., Williams, 1961 

24 Hutton Ave. 

West Orange, N. J. 

Orthopedic Surgery 

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




29 




RICHARD C. WALLACE 

A.B., Yale, 1960 

1 1 Chestnut Place 

Brookline, Mass. 

Surgery 

ST. Vincent's hospital 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



FRANCIS M. WELD 

A.B., Harvard, 1961 

Box 631 

Smithtown, N. Y. 

Medicine 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 





PETER L. WEINGARTEN 

A.B., Yale, 1961 

55 East 210 St. 

New York 67, N. Y. 

Surgery 

EELLEVUE HOSPITAL CENTER 

1ST COLUMBIA SURGICAL DTV. 

NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



JOAN H. WLODKOSKI 

3.S., New Hampshire, 1961 

438 East High St. 

Manchester, Mass. 

Medicine - Pediatrics 

ROOSEVELT HOSPITAL 
NEW YORK, NEW Y'ORK 





IOEL WEINTRAUB 
A.B., Columbia, 1961 
585 Bloomfield Ave. 
Caldwell, N. J. 
Ophthalmology 
GEORGE WASHINGTON 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 



MANUEL F.YVARS 

Columbia 

716 Surfside Blvd. 

Miami Beach, Fla. 

Surgery 

HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 




30 



^^Tipha K^/mecta ^/4lv>ha 



W 




Junior Year 

Philip Hertz 
Lynn Peterson 
Barry Portnoy 
Eric Johnson 
Suzanne Oparil 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Senior Year 

John Blass 
Avrum Bluming 
Oscar Garfein 
Bruce Goldreyer 
Ashley Haase 
Paul Hamada 
Brent Lambert 
George Luhrmann 
Nathaniel Reichek 
Michael Shulman 
Frederick Siegal 
Stephen Slaton-Scheidt 
Lawrence Stern 
Jim Urbach 



31 




Keyser, Condon, McCullough, St. John, missing Oparil 




Class Offi 



Ronald K. St. John 
John J. Keyser 
Suzanne Oparil 
James J. Condon 
William B. McCullough 



icers 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

President of the 

P&S Club 



^yVlessctae from the president 



Four years, at times long, now seem short as 
we dissolve the entity that was the Class of 1965. 
As we pass on to something new, each must pur- 
sue his own path. The preceding years are com- 
posed of the interactions of the class and its mem- 
bers, the students, with the College and its mem- 
bers, the faculty. One has influenced the other, and 
both are changed and enriched by the experience. 

Now, over the last few months, our class has 
slowly dissolved itself as our courses separated us 
into smaller groups. As almost — alumni, we can 
begin to see how much our medical school has 



shaped our lives. We have learned the fundamen- 
tals of our chosen profession. Our faculty has ex- 
posed us to the finest in modem medicine. We 
have acquired a new awareness of the meanings of 
medical research and education and a new concern 
lor both. We have learned from our teachers the 
meaning of a life as a physician. The high standards 
which we have acquired will be carried with us. 

Changes abound within us and about us, faculty 
and student alike. We have taught each other. 

Ronald K. St. John 



32 



THE OATH OF HIPPOCRATES 



dear to me 

my own br< 
to learn it, 
ture, and ev 
edge of the 
to disciples 

of regimen 
sider for th 
ever is delei 
cine to any 
like mannei 
abortion. P 
practice mi 
stone, but i 
ers of this 

the seductit 




- — 




<J he \~-*lasses of 

1966 

1967 
1968 



35 



C7L CLlass of 1966 







Front Baker, Ashman, Tholfson, Hamilton, Molavi 

Back Taylor, Withington, Spotnitz, Barzun, Muller, Kaufman, Miller 




36 



Front Dallow, Stewart, Waters, Corey 

2nd Row Ferguson, Harris, Hamilton, McClelland, Max 

3rd Row Salenger, Spotnitz, Feiger, Arnsdorf, Ballo, Flaumenbaum, Brauninger 

Back Belcher, Barrata, Scott, Giventer, Hildebrand, Taylor, MacKenzie 



L J"L Class of 1967 



« 






I; 








Front Berger, Rosefsky, De Angelis, Waskell, Balch, 

Sweeney 

Back Winickoff, Gaines, Silverstein, Glenn, Levy, Briley, 

Stookey, Brewster, Holschuh 




Front Noel, Howland, Bragg, Kaiser, Jones, Drew, Wohlauer 
Back Wenglin, Cohen, Tillisch, Sullivan, Olds, Spier, Vio- 
lin 







Front Scheinhorn, Russell, Schneider, Penner, Lee, Win- 
slow, Wilson 

Middle Clark, Curci, Garrell, Kolman, Nugent, Gerber, 
Pieri, Fu, Bowen, Sloane 

Back Srodes, Merwin, Andrews, Winner, Brensilver, Olcott, 
Blakey, Myers Clark, Shukovsky 



37 



C7L Class of 1968 





Frcwt Smith, Hager, Pelletier, Musher, Munier, Weisberg, Waletsky, Fries, Beck, 

Blumberg, Snow, Rush 

Middle Zorach, Lipman, Al-Ghamin, Stern, Natanblut, Bosken, Berry, Barsky, 

Banks, Waletsky, Ogundipe 

Back Roman, Jackson, Batki, Blaugrund, Fried, Nowels, Hitzig, Bush, Postley, 

Stovell, Newsome, Davol, Spitzberg, Coyle, Crawford 

niii finiii 




VI * 



Front Eisenberg, Mullin, Rettig, Rhame, Polatin, Leonard, Brackbill, Milsten, 
Vanderbush, Liskow, Harrow, Robinson, Davidson 

Middle Hall, Li, Dreyfus, Garrett, Lankester, Botsford, Polak, Lo, Martin, Dun- 
ham, Saltonstall 

Back McNeill, Rascoff, Workum, Griffith, Alford, Heller, Hanusfield, Buder, 
Gullion, Bender, Corwin, Hefler, Erickson, Wolferstan, Boxhill, Makover 




Front Davis, Brackbill, Baker, Ambard, Sorabella, Utermohlen, Shute, Patterson, 
MacLeod, Crawford, Mayer 

Back Gunnell Leonard, Kiess, Lattes, Blackshe, Stevenson, Brand, Reisen, Ziegler, 
Nicholson, Black, Rubin, DeSilvey 



38 



tS^yestinct: ^^rnatomu &L^. 



esson 



These thirty corpses in one room 
Are cut up, and I dwell on death. 
My face presses against the bones. 
Here, nothing smacks nor smells of love. 
The day's work done, I clean my watch 
And leave for home while it's still light. 

Untouched, nothing's grotesque in death. 

It's when I'm tearing meat from bones 

The thought, "This carcass once made love," 

Hits home. Upset, I strain to watch 

Some nerve's white path, but than my light 

Grows dim. I hate the corpse-filled room. 

It takes time to study bones, 

Which means there's less time left for love. 

My love knows this, and keeps her watch, 

Makes me hot tea, burns her night-light. 

We've fun together in our room 

At last, after I'm through with death. 

We've moments now of subtler love. 
I know her thoughts. I love to watch 
Her move about: Her body's light, 
So that she bobs from room to room. 
Some nights, though, I've dreams of death. 
I wake then, eat, and move my bones 

Back to the lab. I set my watch 

And get my knife, turn on the light, 

Put my note-books down where there's room. 

My partners are burlesquing death, 

While I probe this old hobo's bones 

And wonder what's become of love. 

One partner falls into my light. 

Phenol's wry stench fills the room. 

I ask, why must we study death? 

"All medicine's built on these bones," 

A doctor says. "Take care to love 

These bones you touch. Take care to watch." 

I nod. The light's bad in this room. 
I vow to watch and touch all bones. 
To live with love I'll finger death. 



MICHAEL L GLENN 



39 



m 

i 



l 



:- ^ 



*Ci 





<z/*fdm in is tra tio n 
^Xtnd 
■racultyi 




41 




H. HOUSTON MERRITT, M.D. 
Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 



42 




GEORGE A. PERERA, M.D. 

Associate Dean 



43 





MELVIN D. YAHR, M.D. 
Assistant Dean 



J. FREDERICK EAGLE, M.D. 
Assistant Dean 




EDWIN M. BARTON, B.D. 

Director of Student Activities 

and the P&S Club 



44 




George Smelser No, I'm Dr. Smelser 
. . . Dr. Copenhaver is over there. 




<zAtn 



atorn 



w 



Herbert Elftman Welcome to 
Inner Sanctum. 



Wilfred Copenhaver If you think the answer 

is true, then put an X in the box marked "true." 

And if you think . . . 



^W. /Wic 



M*vl»iA 



Mand.fcU 




Charles Ely Now wait a minute 



. I knew this 
last night. 





Albert Pickled in 
bond. 



: 






45 




Charles Noback I can never remember this stuff! 





George Pappas We've done it — 90 
proof tropocollagenl 



Frederic Agate It's gotta be in here 
somewhere, dammit. 



Malcolm Carpenter All the nuclei are 

ambiguous. 

46 





David Nachmansohn Everybody 
disagrees with me bat me. 




David Shemin Now I'll turn into Dr. 
Jekyll again! 



Seymour Lieberman So we added a methyl 
group . . . and she turned into a manl 





David Rittenberg Why are all of you 
so hostile? 



< £j iocn emis trxt 



*% I'u | rp 




i 


' IVVR 


W^ ? 1 




W 

r 1 





Erwin Chargaff Ochoa? Gesundheitl 



47 






John V. Taccart J must be holding 
this backwards or something . . . 




William L. Nastuk I've lost my nerve! 



Walter S. Root Hap- 
piness is a puppy. 




Louis T. Cizek . . . and 

the kidney pumps blood! 



Mero Nocenti How do you make a 
hormone? 



William W. Walcott You do see that 
A and B are similarly unrelated? 






Herbert Bartelstone Oops, cut 

myself . . . Oh, no! D-tubocurarine! 

AAAAARGH . . . 





Wilbur Sawyer Wanna play with my 
electric nephron? 



Frederick Hofmann 
Chivas Regal with- 
drawel syndrome? 




Harry van Dyke What are the 
side effects of Geritol? 



VL 



avvnaco 



L 



•&y 




Shih-Chun Wang Let me explain what 1 just 



say . 



49 




Donald McKay They'll never get this 

one. 



f^^atkolo 




David Spiro Look ma, no cigarette. 



w 



Stanley Simbonis This is no 
laughing matter. 





Raffaele Lattes And the next slide shows no 
approximation without strangulation. 




Nathan Lane And this speci- 
men comes from the cafeteria. 




William Blanc Biopsy 
shcnvs 'Honeymoon Cystitis'? 




Abner Wolf Confidentially, I 

can't tell an astrocyte from a 

hole in the head. 





— 



Virginia Kneeland Frantz 
You're looking for my brother 
Harvard? 

These Pathology parties get better every year! 





Harky Rose And may I add, parenthetically, en 
passant, you're failing. 



i^SVlicrobiolo 



w 




Elvin Kabat His wheal and 
erythema was dark-field positive? 



52 Caldebon Howe It's getting late — time 

to get the floccules otit of here. 




Beatrice Seegal I feel some- 
thing warm running down my 
sleeve . . . 




Herbert 
Rosenkrantz Of 
course viruses Ivme 

relations! 




1 




Stanley Bradley What do 
you mean, you didn't make a 
chart? And stop mumbling . . . 




Insolent dog, 1 AM Julius Caesar!! 



~ 



JHeM 



icine 



Hamilton Southworth I'd 
better ask Randy about this one. 



Charles Ragan In this joint, guys, it's 
every man for himself. 




53 





Dana Atchley Glad to see so many of 
you could come this morning. 



John Laragh Diuretics? 
Well, ethanol is always fun . . . 



Frederick R. Bailey Hello! 
What's this thing? 






Albert Lamb Well, what do 
YOU think is wrong with you? 



David Seegal That's a pearl, son — 
write it down. 




I 



Charles Flood ]ust 

record the guaiacs — 

don't mount them. 




Henry Aranow Congratulations, 

Mrs. Hashimoto, you have 

thyroiditis. 




Sidney Werner Sorry, Henry — that's 
her Adam's apple. 





Stuart Cosgriff Pro time was three 

hours? 




George Perera just for fun, let's say you go 

unmatched . . . 



Andre Cournand They call me 
'AG? 

Dickenson Richards Welcome to my 

library. 




55 





Yale Kneeland 



With the help of Aesadapizis, 
Hygeia, and Penicillin . . . 



Arthur Wertheim We get the mail 
here once a month. 

Donald Tapley Don't you see — I'm on 

your side. 








Jay Meltzer Didn't 

you read the article in 

last night's N.E.].? 



CJra 




Alfred Gellhorn This 
must he right — I wrote it. 





^5^1 






fl 










^m 


^■j ^^ - 




l r ^ — ■ 


ml^^\ 


Wbf- - , 



M. Irene Ferrer Very good. Now turn it 
over and try again. 




Gerard Turino Acute Mood 
loss? That's shocking! 





;k 



Rejane Harvey You don't hear 
it, doctor? It's a grade 5! 




Alfred Fishman Unfortunately, apnea 
ensued just as we were getting started. 



George Curran Our most popu- 
lar diagnostic aid — the Sink Test. 



Glenn Lancer Pull up a loose 
brown stool and join me. 








A^, ■ ^\ i 




rfr 




^vJm 1) 




^ P*i- V 




^jjt 


/ 


wmm 



Richard Stock Let's up the dose to 
7,000 kilovohs. 




Felix Demartini A new 

cure for lupus! "Eye of snake 

. . . tooth of dog . . ." 





Elliott Osserman Dysproteinemia 
is better than no proteinemia at all. 




Charles Christian No, 7, 

don't have a daughter named 

"Candy". 



Kermit Pines Trismus 
. . . not tenesmus! 



David Schachter Let's 

send the machine down to 

make rounds. 




DeWitt Goodman Anyone 
for a beta-lipoprotein martini? 





Albert Grokoest Ya gotta remem- 
ber the human critter in the sack. 



John Ultmann— One more hiss 
and you fail . . . all of you! 



Edgar Leifer Better do it today — 
tomorrow'll be worse. 




Nicholas Christy No, I'm not dropping 
the "y" from my name. 




George Melcher You've handed in the 

same appraisal note six weeks in a row 

. . . and Dana's read it every week! 





Sawnie Gaston It's two o'clock . . . let's 
go to the coffee shop. 



\~Jrthopedi 



ics 



Charles Neer It's two o'clock . . . 
let's go to the coffee shop. 




Leonidas Lantzounis It's two 
o'clock . . . let's go to the coffee shop. 




Halford Haixock It's two o'clock 
. . . let's go to the coffee shop. 





Frederick Craig It's two o'clock . . . 
. . . let's go to the coffee shop. 




Alexander Garcia It's two o'clock 
let's go to the coffee shop. 




Harrison McLaughlin It's two o'clock 
. . . let's go to the coffee shop. 




Andrew Basset It's two o'clock . . . 
lets go to the coffee shop. 




Frank Stinchfield It's two o'clock . . . where 
the hell is everybody? 




George H. Humphreys II We have the hest surgery 
department on the block. 



s, 



George Crikelair You want what 
grafted where??? 



uvaer 



yery 




Cushman Haagensen Of course you'll he 
able to wear a topless bathing suit! 



John Prudden I just cut my finger off 
. . . again. 



62 





Philip Wiedel ". . . completed by a pas de deux 

with 8-0 silk." 





Milton 'Porter Stop bleeding!! I'm 
coming as fast as 1 can!! 



J Edmund Goodman You've never heard 
of an electroesophagogastrogram? 



Shivaji Rhonslay 1 did too wash my 

hands! 



v 


i 


I 


• — 




i> «*.,| 




James Malm Dr. Frankenstein, we've created LIFE!! 





David Habif Was that gas you just passed? 



Cam. Feind . . . and this line means you're 
going to have your thyroid out. 





Jose Ferrer Another fan letter 
from Audrey. 



Robert Wylie And at thora- 
cotomy we found it was a coin! 



J 




Grant Sanger Of course I 

draw tltem big! Don't you 

like them fcig? 



All right, doctor — what are the Tour Humours? 



64 




\ 




Robert Hiatt And you get a lifetime 
supply of plastic bags! 




Arthur Voorhees Let's anasto- 
mose something new this week! 




Ferdinand McAllister If 
DeBakey does it in 40 min- 
utes, why can't we? 



-*lV._ 







John Scudder All my per- 
sonnel liave hollow teeth too. 
Count. 



Harold Barker Why not re- 
move 90 per cent of his liver? 
All the dogs pull through! 




Robert Elliott, Jr. 

But the nurse said the 

sponge count was correct! 





Hugh Auchincloss, Jr. What's this 
"RectoT of Justin" business? 




Thomas Santulli Now then, Mrs. 

Hirschsprung, what's this problem 

junior's been having? 



sCZS^fnesthesio/o 



w 




Shih-Hsun Ngai I find just oxygen 

and curare quite suitable for some 

cases. 




Emanuel Papper About your exam . . . 
you took gas! 



f 



66 



Richard Kitz Oops! I've intubated the 
wrong end of the patient! 



ii4 j* ! . 



^j 




Gilbert Vosburgh These -pains are 
coming three minutes apart. 







Howard C. Taylor, )r. At your cervix, 

madame. 



OL.Q b 



v 



n 





Harold Speert So that's where babies come from! 



Anthony D'Esopo I understand, 
miss . . . you're not the first one. 



67 




Saul Gusberg Another hard day at the 

orifice. 





Landrum Shettles Well, 

mam, I'm afraid you ovulate 

like a chicken. 



Duane Todd And he think he's the father . . . ha! 



Charles Steer Now there's a pelvis you 
can really sink your teeth into! 





Robert Hall Firs You Best 





William Cavanaugh You mean 
you still use that greasy kid staff? 



Raymond Vande Wiele Und 1 say 
Stein mid Levanthal were both fakes! 





Anna Southam Uyspareunia is better than 
no -pareunia at all! 



Albert Plentl What's the difference 
between a placenta and a bowling ball? 



69 




Lawrence Kolb Smile, you're on 
Candid Camera! 



j^such iatrM 




William Langford Good morning, 

Mrs. Rex. How has little Oedipus 

been doin ° this week? 




Donald Kornfeld Whaddya mean 
manic? I'm just happy! 




70 



Phillip Polatin You WHAT??? Out of 

my office!! 




George Wit kit. What does 
"hair" mean to him? 




Donald Dunton All right, 1 
like kids. So xvliat? 





Israel Kesselbrenner Our 

next guest is Barhara, from 

Brooklyn . . . Let's give her a 

hig hand. 



William Horwitz 

What makes you think 

I'm her father? 




Sidney Malitz No, really, 1 

just haven't had time to take the 

stuff. 



71 




Edward Curnen, Jr. Hattie, 

let me run the conference 

today. 



pediatrics 




Sidney Blumenthal It's obviously a 
Tetralogy of what's-his-name. 





Robert U'inters No sugar 
in mine, thanks — jast salt. 



Hattie Alexander Another case of Hemophilus 

vaginitis! 






* 



M 



Douglas Damrosch J 

wonder how this would work 

as a proctoscope? 




Melvin Gbumbach After $18,000 worth 
of tests, we found out he was a female. 




Gilbert Mellin "Which twin has the Toni?" 




Rhoda Mickey / told you 

not to wear your best tie 

to clinic! 



James Wolff You just hold here and 

squeeze . . . and squeeze . . . and 

squeeze . . . 





William Silverman And these are our hreeding 

tanks. 



•nr 




John Brush Is anyone 
listening? 



1 / 




William Bauman Frankly, I'm 
sick of Well Baby Clinic too. 



Herbert Cohen What's 
this "Perspiration Test"? 




74 



* 



\*g* 




Ruth Harris )nst 

offhand. I'd say he has 

d-cellulolevoporphyroglx- 

colic dehydrobezoarase 

deficiency. Wouldn't you? 




Sidney Carter Any more 
questions about the 
cremasteric reflex? 





Carmine Vicale Our 

group had 43 % fewer 
cavities! 



Paul Hoefer "Who's a knee jerk? 



Melvev Yahr You say the room- 
seems to he turning around? 




Daniel Sciarra Now try 

balancing this pencil on the 

end of your nose. 




H. Houston Merritt 

Bring in the next vegetable. 



<y\eurolo 



w 




J. Lawrence Pool (Neurosurgery) 

Before the operation he couldn't even 

remember his own name . . . now he 

just can't say it. 




William Seaman Note the absence of 
a positive Throckmorton Sign. 



hCadiolo 



w 





Juan Taveras An obvious case of 
squashrot. 




Ralph Schlaeger The 

technique is poor but at least xve 

can say that he has a stomach. 




David Baker Lolita who? 




Kent Ellis This is the wildest IVP I've seen yet! 




Milos Basek In Prague we 
called, it the Trench Disease. 




Robert Hui Dr. Who? 





Daniel Baker So I said to Captain 
Video . . . 



K^Jto Ictrvj nao ioavj 




Bela Marquit Hello. Postnasal drip got you 
down? Try Dristan! 



Jules Waltner Touche . . right in the snoot! 




Carl Nelson If it's dry, wet it; if it's 
wet, dry it; if it itches, scratch it. 



2) 



ermatoloay 



L 




John Lattimer No matter how much you shake 
it, the last drop always goes in your pants. 




Philip Loweneish Note the 
Tiparillo-shaped macroconidia. 




Leo Schweich Dot's ha pimple, 
dot's fot it iss. 



lArolo 



w 



78 



Hans Zinsser If someone gave me 

two million dollars, I'd get out of 

urology. 



V 



Ray Trussell Just be ready 
when they come to the front door'. 

JT revert tive Ot 
<^/^ dm in istvative 
i^Srleaicin e 





I 




1 *:P ■ 


K*~ ^ 




%z * 


-JP 





Leonard Goldwater Who do 
you think I voted for? 




J 



Harold Brown You'll like this course once you 

get your nose in it. 




Robert Darling This man has 

had his hip fused to his ear for 

30 years . . How can we liel-p him? 



\^Jpn th alwi oloofu 



A. Gerard DeVoe 

Another Glass Liver — 
Bio Eve Syndrome. 




Charles Perera My 

brother? He hasn't been 

heard from since March 

8th. 






m 



etvospectoscope 




V 



in! 



i 



II 






i ..a ; - 






I 



"'''Hii; 

* - - ■ • .1 



I I 



ii 1 



•■ ■■ i 



i — 



ill 

[lj 



Il 



II Li 



> .! 



■ i 






<«& 



■v 



.H.* 









(Z/ass T^ocm 1965 

Unique at first, then bound as one, 

We came, green with expectation, 

Straws wrapped to whisks by fortune's sleight, 

Eager to clean the common slate. 

See: four hot years have settled us, 
Burnt straw, spun metal in its place; 
Unique, we've been transformed and honed, 
Our hopes set on more solid ground. 

Transformed. For so the common flames, 
Goading us toward our daedal arms. 
Have scarred us, branded us alike, 
(Unique!) while skill and sense grew ripe. 

Cooling now, we contemplate 

Those future tasks which we must meet, 

And, saddened, for we separate, 

Leave common words to mark this date: 

ENVOI. Hippocrates, our guide, watch over us, 

Preserve our sense, our skills and selves, our troth, 
Our wit, our wives, our world. Be generous 
And keep us all from arrogance and sloth. 

MICHAEL L GLENN 



83 



v Aass <J~tis 



tory 



Four years of wisdom and absurdity 
make a nice gamble. We took it, wagering 
four years' hard work against future se- 
curity: professional satisfaction: the high 
part of the hog. The game each of us 
played was different, but the context — 
curriculum, faculty, students, city — was 
the same. The difference came in our 
choice of just how much to endure, to 
want, to take seriously, to take lightly: we 
made our own stakes. Yet, although each 
of us played his game, let it not be 
thought we were an unserious group: for 
our choices were in earnest. 

First year. We were a raggletaggle 
bunch. Casual humanists, sons of profes- 
sional people, wry Ivies, intense science 
majors, young innocents: we viewed each 
other with suspicion and skepticism at our 
opening teas, then slowly began the pro- 
cess of assimilating a mutual identity. Com- 
mon experiences helped: watching a short 
mustachio throw eggs into the air without 
catching them (the mad pope); slicing 
open cats and dogs, infusing chemicals into 
their veins, disposing of them when our 
experiments were done, learning to leave 
the heap of offal, fur, blood and yowls 
without second thoughts; dissecting the 
remnants of some octogenarian: our intro- 
duction to the basic sciences. 

We were engrossed in finding out 
about each other. We spent hours in bull 
sessions, slowly transforming ourselves from 
college students to physicians. An eerie 
isolation from the rest of society augment- 
ed our coherence; so did our being to- 
gether on the bottom-most rung of the 
totem; so did our being supported, still, by 
sighing, good-hearted, well-intentioned, lov- 
ed and resented parents. We steeped our- 
selves in the smells and sounds of the 
medical center and learned to band to- 
gether after a harrowing day's work. 

The game set up deep ambivalences, as 
some even now began to jockey for posi- 
tion. Yet we drove on, past the obstacles of 
genetics quizzes; past madcap anatomy 
rituals in which, to the timing of a loud 
gong, we rushed about the littered tables 
trying frantically to identify the tagged 
bits of dead, dried tissue on which our 
grade and class standing depended, while 
inside our heads a louder gong pealed out 
"Absurd, insane, ridiculous!"; past lectures 
which we joked about, which went by so 
fast we could not write down all that was 
said, felt humiliated at having to endure 
it, suffered that important topics were 




84 






flung at us in so short a time while we 
were left to pore through books as if there 
had been no lecture at all. These, and 
other sottisms: we accepted, learning both 
of the absurd and of ourselves. Some left, 
unable to see the sense. Others, with more 
patience perhaps, stayed on. Our jokes 
grew frenetic; our class show was hilarious. 

Second year. By the second year we 
were impatient. Personalities intrigued us: 
the softspoken bald psychiatrist who told 
us of children while rubbing the top of his 
shiny head with a cupped hand; the bril- 
liant stutterer who drove us mad while seiz- 
ing our admiration; the Brooklvn-toned re- 
searcher, delighted to expose our ignorance 
and thwart our bets, whose nastiest pose 
only met with our own delight and incred- 
ulity; the stalwart surgeon who seemed as- 
cetic, noble, wise, as he introduced us to 
his field; his coworker, untiring in teach- 
ing, profound and fiercely logical : all those 
who held themselves up to us, giving us 
an image of our own future. We were im- 
pressed — impressed, but still impatient. 
We wanted "real" experience. 

Our thrust in this direction found form 
in the grand old man teaching us his last 
formal course, speaking to us of the con- 
crete, elemental, fascinatingly arcane phy- 
sical signs of diagnosis, our basic tools in 
future practice. We idolized him for his 
learning, but even more for his manner: 
for he played his game as if he knew of 
ours: a proper amount of self-mockery, a 
counterbalance of supposed self-love, a 
ploy of being slow-moving therefore slow- 
minded which led to sudden astonishment 
at his own performance, wit oozing from 
the thick pool of realization that one was 
only human, had only so many years after 
all, had only so much skill, so much power, 
and yet had the choice of playing it all 
fully, top stakes, and of letting the wheel 
determine the rest, judgment reserved for 
others but effort one's own to pour forth. 
We loved him, seeing in him our own 
imaginings. Had we his wit, his presence, 
his speech, his mind ... it gave us hope 
to think that we might take him as a goal; 
and so we strove to learn, yearning for and 
dreading his praise. 

By night, we scrubbed the day's data 
from our minds, wondering again where 
we were headed, thinking of marriage, 
wife, girl, loneliness. The worst sacrifice 
had turned out to be time. We rejoiced, 
learning sublimation. 

Third year. This was what we had 
been waiting for. We were suddenly clin- 
icians. Gaul-like, tripartite, we shuffled 
through our rotations with alacrity. 

The high point of it all was, of course, 



85 



our Medicine clerkship. For two years we 
had anticipated the Crucial Test: baptism: 
ordeal by fire: everlasting tattoo. We en- 
tered scared, seeing the Chief as the 
Bogey Man. Then, one by one, each ad- 
vanced to that morning of confrontation: 
all or nothing: four years balanced on a 
pin. We feigned calm or panic, which- 
ever we felt most comfortable with, and, 
gathering the support of our friends about 
us like a protective shield, we dragged our 
cumbrous charts to bedside, smiled help- 
lessly at the patient, and unleashed our 
tautly memorized speeches, hoping to 
Galen that the Chief was benign that day, 
would not ask us an innocently relevant 
question which, striking us like a thunder- 
bolt, might leave us spastic and melan- 
cholic for the next five weeks. Only when 
it was over could we see it "in perspective", 
neither here nor there: but on Presentation 
Eve, all the demons of the world lurked 
unexorcised within us. Next time we 
would take it easier. 

This was also the year that the class 
became a class. No outsider, no matter 
how friendly, how empathetic, how close, 
can understand what this struggle meant. 
To some of the faculty, it was post-adoles- 
cent posturing and rebellion; to others, 
laziness. To some it may have seemed a 
lark, a joke, a circus. But to us who experi- 
enced it, it was a searing rite whose enact- 
ment united the whole class under a spirit 
of idealistic, moral, purposeful fervor never 
felt before. We assumed a responsibility for 
our education; from that point on, we were 
marked by it. Yes, we deplored the 
struggle, found the bruised feelings on 
each side painful and hard to watch. Yet 
afterwards, we had new respect for our- 
selves and for our profession. The whole 
school, we felt, had won in the struggle. 

The year zipped past. Contact among 
us began to slip a little. 

Fourth year. Now, like the tribes of 
Israel, we wandered through the fourth 
year program, passing time until the in- 
ternships were announced, choosing our 
future course, trying to see friends and 
talk. 

We were more serious, fatter, less re- 
bellious, perhaps even less competitive. 
Some went to Goldwater, finding satisfac- 
tion in hard work and responsibility. Bud- 
ding surgeons came forth in their talents, 
su'bintemed, tied themselves in ecstatic 
knots. We watched and delivered babies, 
worked in clinics, had more time to think. 



86 







At home, children sprouted from our loins, 
For our wives were, sometimes unexpected- 
ly, fertile. 

The year revolved about March 8th, 
when our magic lists found final expres- 
sion, committing us in concrete fashion to 
time, place and future. We had told our- 
selves again it didn't matter, but again we 
had played a game. We began to see our- 
selves and each other in the years ahead, 
divined our special games, sucked ambi- 
tion's sugared pap. 

The pattern, the game: these continue. 
Our gamble has been taken; our commit- 
ment made. Future directions seem much 
clearer. 

M. CLENN 




87 




and met more new friends. 





You want to bounce another check off 
its, darling? 



90 James quaffs while Scielzo 

takes it in the auditory canal 



WY 


ere's Ringo? 




*■ n 


• 


i 


■^k i « - Ji 



HALLLPU! 



,# 



1 1 



I 



(I 



iirk 



So l says to him "Shove it, mac, I'm going 
into research'." 




But Dr. Kneelcmd, this man 
doesn't have a PMI! 




Students learn the basic skills of phys- 
ical diagnosis by practicing on each 
other 








Look at these lab results! Maybe we'd 
better do a history and physical. 



















^SsBSm 








— — , — i 




^^ww 












I 


1 


i"'t&^ 





Keep off what? 




Easy there, big fellaM 



You can hear anything with a 
Littman! 



91 




Sgt. Branscom of the Yukon: "On 
King . . . On you huskies!" 



On The Bench with the Matterns 




"Play it again, Sam." 





Will the REAL Mike 
Glenn please stand 
up? 




Cole on the roclis 



"1 never had diplopia un- 
til 1 came to live in Bard 
Hall" 





Come on, guys. Fun is fun, but 
this is ridiculous! 




Stu Rose spends another interesting and in- 
structive morning in the ninth floor laboratory. 




You never outgrow yonr need for beer. 




March 8, 1965: 7:30 A.M. Bloody 
Mary party . . . Compazine, anyone? 



Finkelstein of Arabia 



S, 



onsors 

Dr. William Amols Dr. 

Dr. Arthur Antenucci Dr. 

Dr. Dana W. Atchley Dr. 

Dr. Frederick R. Bailey Dr. 

Dr. Daniel C. Baker, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. John M. Baldwin, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. Milos Basek Dr. 

Dr. Frederick O. Bowman, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. Stanley E. Bradley Dr. 

Dr. Harold W. Brown Dr. 

Dr. Charles L. Christian Dr. 

Dr. Wilfred M. Copenhaver Dr. 

Dr. James W. Correll Dr. 

Dr. Stuart W. Cosgriff Dr. 

Dr. George F. Crikelair Dr. 

Dr. Edward C. Curnen, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. George L. Curran Dr. 

Dr. Robert C. Darling Dr. 

Dr. A. Gerard DeVoe Dr. 

Dr. Frederick J. Eagle Dr. 

Rr. Robert H. E. Elliot, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. Charles W. Findlay, Jr. Dr. 

Dr. Charles A. Flood Dr. 

Dr. Vincent J. Freda Dr. 

Dr. Alexander Garcia Dr. 

Dr. Edmund N Goodman Dr. 

Dr. Albert W. Grokoest Dr. 

Dr. David V. Habif Dr. 

Dr. Robert B. Haitt Dr. 

Dr. Brian Hoffman Dr. 

Dr. William A. Horowitz Dr. 

Dr. Edgar M. Housepian Dr. 

Dr. Calderon Howe Dr. 

Dr. Robert M. Hui Dr. 

Dr. George H. Humphreys II Dr. 

Dr. Raffaele Lat+es Dr. 

Dr. Elvin A. Kabat Dr. 

Dr. John M. Kinney Dr. 

Dr. Yale Kneeland Dr. 

Dr. Lawrence C. Kolb Dr. 

Dr. Donald S. Kornfeld Dr. 

Dr. John H. Laragh Dr. 
Dr. Hans H. Zinsser 



John K. Lattimer 
Edgar Leifer 

and Mrs. Robert F. Loeb 
Donald G. McKay 
William M. Manger 
Alfred M. Markowitz 
George W. Melcher 
H. Houston Merritt 
Charles S. Neer II 
C. Paul O'Connell 
Emanuel M. Papper 
Charles A. Perera 
George A. Perera 
Phillip Polatin 
Lawrence J. Pool 
Milton R. Porter 
John Prudden 
Charles A. Ragan 
Robert M. Reiss 
Dickinson W. Richards 
David Rittenberg 
Harry M. Rose 
Grant Sanger 
Thomas V. Santulli 
Anna L. Southam 
Hamilton Southworth 
Frank E. Stinchfield 
Herbert C. Stoerk 
Donald F. Tapley 
John V. Taggart 
Jaun M. Taveras 
Howard C. Taylor 

Ray E. Trussell 

Raymond Vande Weile 

Ralph J. Veenema 

Carmine T. Vicale 

Jules Waltner 

Shih-Chun Wang 

Arthur R. Wertheim 

Robert C. Wheeter 

Philip D. Wiedel 

James N. Worcester, Jr. 



97 




Surveying village health needs, an SK&F Foreign Fellow examines a child in 
Kurali, near New Delhi, India. 



INDIA... 
TANGANYIKA... 

IRAN... 
GUATEMALA... 



At hospitals and medical outposts a long way from 
the classroom, medical students learn to cope with 
unfamiliar diseases; help to provide much-needed 
medical services to people in underdeveloped areas of 
the world; and contribute to international under- 
standing and good will. 

This unusual opportunity to work and study in for- 
eign countries is offered to students through the 
Foreign Fellowships Program of Smith Kline & French 
Laboratories. Administered by the Association of 
American Medical Colleges, the program has enabled 
123 students to work in 40 different countries during 
the past four years. Junior and senior medical stu- 
dents are eligible to apply for Fellowships, which 
provide for an average of 12 weeks' work abroad to 
be completed before internship. 

Students who are interested in Fellowships should 
apply through the deans of their schools. 

Smith Kline & French Laboratories 



98 







''T/tt Imk ~4^t tmki- U/uU^-^ w^" 




MANUFACTURERS OF 
ENAMELED AND STAINLESS STEEL 

'Laboratory Furniture 
'Hospital Casework 

'Operating Room Equipment 
'Wheeled Hospital Equipment 



S. BLICKMAN, INC. • Weehawken, New Jersey 



The Medical Center Bookstore 

Extends Its Sincerest Good Wishes 

To 
The Class Of 1965 



100 



K^^/ass O/j 




The Turaco bird . . . hy- 
drocoprotryptognaiacopor- 
phyrin type III at work 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF THE 



P&S ALUMNI 
ASSOCIATION 



To Each Member Of The Class Of 1965 

The P&S Alumni Association Extends 

Its Best Wishes For A Happy 

And Successful Career. 



102 



Tasty Delicatessen 

CATERING — TABLE SERVICE 

Sandwiches Our Specialty 
4020 Broadway, corner 169 St. 



Center 
Home Appliance - Discount 

Television * Stereos * Air Conditioners 

Sales - Repairs on All Makes 

Special Hospital Discount SW 5-1563 

St. Nicholas Ave. & 170 St. SW 5-0828 



To Hospital Associates, Affiliates, 
& Employees 

Your Neighborhood 
BARRICIN! CANDY SHOP 

ANNOUNCES A 15% DISCOUNT ON 

PURCHASES OF ONE DOLLAR OR 

MORE 

on — ALL stationery * toys * stuffed animals 

gift items * pipes * paperback books * watches 

clocks * party items * sunglasses * and more! 

4017 B'way (169th St.) — WA 3-8080 

Remembrance Shop 



CONGRATULATIONS, DOCTOR! 

$$$$$$ AVAILABLE $$$$$$ 

Our Professional Men's Loan Program Is 

"OPERATING" 

To Serve You 

Please Come In Or Call - - - CY5-I030 

"No Appointment Necessary" 

"Night Calls" Until 8:00 P.M. 

Monday & Friday 



A 



mencan 



■ rust company 

70 Wall Street, New York 5, N.Y. 

301 East Fordham Road, Bronx 58, N.Y. 



THIS IS THf RUST 
CM. P. C... Ik, C.P.M.C 
ADMISSION »L THIS 
fc5 ... EB., AH, ?i... 
"A 73 ^/CAR. OLj> 

GeMTieMA.. I MfAfJ 

LADy, WHO PR.E- 

SeMTeo yesTEe...- 
No, ah, Poufi. Mp 
A60, CtwPLAlAilrtb 
o^r HEAMCWe... 
EB., I MZAri 

&A«ACHE... Mo, 

iaIAit A /vllAHTF. 

FtArJIc PA|M? Mo... 

(M... EAMCHE ? 

wen., Anyway, wf 

MVE H6R. TH0IW2IAJ6 

4md UH^revea it vws, 

l"T IS fe7«A)E fJow! 

Aou/iiiy, Dr.. BfcADLey, 
you Sour >\ ^uJ-Pt^-i 5et 

(Me SHOvJIrJfe UP TOW flrll) 




Luigi's Restaurant & Bar 

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS 
LEADING ITALIAN RESTAURANTS 

I 148 St. Nicholas Avenue 
Bet. 167th and 1 68th Sts. 

WA. 3-9216 — 9217 

4199 Broadway 
At 178th St. 

WA. 3-9181 —WA. 8-9601 



Pollack's Bar-B-Que 

Bar-b-que Chicken 4 Ribs 

Fried chicken, fish, shrimp, salads, dinners 

4029| Broadway WA 8-9664 



Compliments of 

Excel Pastry 

3929 Broadway, near 165 St. 



103 




CONGRATULATIONS and BEST WISHES 

To 

THE CLASS OF 1965 

From 

The Manager and Staff of Bard Ha 



104 



Serving the Medical Profession 
Since 1882 



Ute 



\culuf 



AMBULANCE SERVICE 

OXYGEN THERAPY SERVICE 

SICK-ROOM SUPPLIES 

Office and Showroom 

505 East I I 6th Street 

New York, New York 10029 

TR 6-6100 

Day and Night 



OtMey's Luncheonette 

"Home Cooking At Its Best" 

4059 Broadway by 171 St. 

WA 3-9748 



A & E Furniture Corp. 

FINE MODERN FURNITURE 
4044 Broadway by 170 St. LO 8-0535 



24 HOUR SERVICE ON COLOR 




MORRIS CAMERA SHOP 

3958 Broadway (166th St.) 

Opposite Medical Center 

Phone LO. 8-8590 

Special Discounts to Students 



COURTESY CARDS 

Medical Center Pharmacy 

4013 Broadway bet. 168th and 169th Sti. 
WA. 3-1258 

Specialists In Prescription Compounding 



The Friendly Shop 

Social and Commercial Stationery 

Greeting Cards — Box Candy 

4007 Broadway WA 3-8757 



UPTOWN 
Wines & Liquor Store 

Incorporated 

4033 Broadway at 170 Street 

New York 32, New York 

LO. 8-2100 



REME RESTAURANT 

FOOD OF DISTINCTION 

4021 Broadway, Corner 169th St. 

New York City 

Air Conditioned 



Compliments Of 

Realty Hardware Co., Inc. 



1235 St. Nicholas Ave. 
Near 172 St. 



Dr. M. Ronson 
Optometrist 

4077 Broadway at 170 St. 



105 



IT ,£ZOfr J he *£>< 



oo 




Anthony M. Flower Shop 

Fresh Flowers Daily 

We deliver at once. Just call. 

1 0% Discount to Medical Center Personnel 

4034 Broadway between 1 69 & 1 70 St. 
Telephone 923-3436 



SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 
Specialist In 

INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 

233 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y. 
BEekman 3-6620 





KRAMER 
SURGICAL STORES 
SCIENTIFIC CORP. 

544 West 168th Street 
New York 32, N.Y. 



ELITE FRENCH CLEANERS 

ONE HOUR SERVICE 

EXPERT TAILORING 

Work Done on the Premises - We Pick Up 4 Deliver 

4057 Broadway bet. 170th & 171st Sts. 
Tel.: WA. 7-5872 



106 




The 

clear 
conclusion 

from 

10 years' 

experience, 




belongs in every practice 

Miltoww 

(meprobamate) 



#. 



WALLACE LABORATORIES/Cranbury, N. J. 



SANDOZ 
RESEARCH CENTER 

a new addition to Pharmaceutical Progress 




The new Sandoz Research Center is one of the most modern and best equipped research 
facilities in the nation. Here we will seek to acquire fresh knowledge in the field of 
therapeutics. 

Although much of the research will be at the "basic" level, special emphasis will be 
given to the search for compounds with potential therapeutic value. It is our expectation 
that the outcome of basic and applied research will be new drugs — the sign of steady 
progress toward directed goals. 

The Center dedicates itself to improving the future of man's health by helping to make 
the vision of a cure or treatment for every type of disease become a reality. 



- SANDOZ PHARMACEUTICALS, HANOVER. N.J • ORIGINAL RESEARCH SERVING THE PHYSICIAN 




SANDOZ 



TIME WRITERS, INC. 



CONGRATULATES THE 

CLASS OF 1965 

FINANCIAL PLANNING DESIGNED FOR THE SENIOR STUDENT 
INTERN, RESIDENT 

Underwritten through 

MASSACHUSETTS MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

320 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10022 

MU 8-8300 



WALTER F. BROOKS 



Representatives 



ROBERT B. HALLORAN 



COCHRANE PHYSICIANS' SUPPLIES INC. 

521 EAST 72nd STREET 
NEW YORK 21. N. Y. 



LEONARD W. McHUGH 
PRESIDENT 



YUKON 8-S080 



TROPICAL 
GARDENS 



GR> 



ON BROADWAY 



Bet. 169th and 170th Streets 



WA. 3-8918 



109 



WA. 7-5700 



Lie. 532 



M. CITARELLA, Inc. 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

Visit Our Wine Cellar 

3915 BROADWAY near 164th STREET 
NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 



Expert Tailor and Cleaners 

J. Frenk 

230 Fort Washington Ave. WA 7-3884 

All Kinds of Alterations — Satisfaction Guaranteed 



Hong Lu Restaurant 

4073 Broadway, near 172 St. 

Original Chinese Food 

Take Home Orders 



Armory Restaurant 

FINE AMERICAN - ITALIAN FOOD 
Newly Redecorated Dining Room 

4001 Broadway bet. 168th & 169th Sts. 
WA. 3-9034 




BUILDERS 



NEW YORK 
WASHINGTON 



SAN JUAN 
LOS ANGELES 



HEIGHTS r r , 

Camera Center 

The Leading Brands In Photographic 
Equipment And Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

The Finest Quality In Photo Finishing 
Done On Premises 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 
Bet. 171st and 172nd Sts. 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

WA. 3-3698 



110 




Greetings From The Class Of !JJp5 1965 



Expert Custom Photography For All Occasions 



ROGER STUDIOS 



PORTRAITS of DISTINCTION 

4143 Broadway 

New York 32, New York 

WA 7-7894 

WE KEEP NEGATIVES OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS ON FILE 
FOR MANY YEARS AFTER GRADUATION 



111 




Education insured against everything but poor marks 



You can be sure of getting enough money for your child's edu- 
cation at Manufacturers Hanover. 

You can borrow from $300 to $10,000 for one to four years 
of schooling at any level. And take up to six years to repay. 

You owe it to yourself to compare loan costs with the cost of 
the Insured Education Loan Plan at Manufacturers Hanover. 

Life insurance is provided without any physical examination, 
thus insuring that funds will be available for the student's con- 
tinued education in the event of the death of the borrower. 

Over 130 branches in the city; most open Mondays 6 to 8 p.m. 



Typical Manufacturers Hanover Low-Cost Education Loans 



be linai 



Course 
of study 



Period o! 
Repa' 



ent 



Monthly Cost 

epaymertt Per Year 



$1,000 
1,000 
4,000 

10,000 



1 year 
1 year 
4 years 
4 years 



12 months 
24 months 
48 months 
72 months 



$85.41 
44.21 
86.33 

154.18 



Includes the cost o> Irle insurance 
PROMPT SERVICE-LOW RATES 



$24.92 
30.52 
35.96 

183.49 




PERSONAL LOAN DEPARTMENT 



MANUFACTURERS HANOVER TRUST 



112 



WA. 3-2424 



"Say It With Flowers" 



Medical Center Flower Shop 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

ARTISTIC DECORATION FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
The Flower Shop Nearest The Medical Center 

"We Telegraph Flowers" 

4003 Broadway at 168th Street 



Center Pizza 

Opposite Medical Center 
Pizza, Hero Sandwiches 

Food to Take Out. 
I 1 56 St. Nicholas Ave. 



Ringler-Rados Surgical Corp. 



OUR 40TH YEAR OF SERVICE 
Across From The Medical Center 



3958 Broadway at ' 6S St 



WA. 7-21523921 



Tel: LO. 8-1230 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

NICK TSAKIRIDIS 

4021 Broadway New York 32 

Bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 



Golden Ace Restaurant 

Specializing in Seafood, Steaks & Chops 

Soda Fountain Service 

4019 Broadway by 169 St. 





NELSON'S 

KOSHER DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT 

CATERERS 

Home Cooked Lunches 

and Full Course Dinners 

Wines - Liquors - Cocktails Served 

4041 Broadway (Corner 170th St.) 
WA. 3-9606 



EVERYTHING For 
HOME & SCHOOL 



Wadsworth 5 & 10c Stores 



4050 Broadway at 1 70 St. 



Vic. Greenebaum, Inc. 

haberdasher 

lady manhattan 
manhattan shirts 
McGregor sportswear 
interwoven hose 
truval shirts 

4009 Broadway WA. 3-4220 

Professional Discount 



113 



WA. 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 

JEWELER 
Electronically Tested Watch Repair 

4009 Broadway at 168th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 



Best Wishes to The Class of 1965 

Kat-z Friendly Luncheonette 

True Homemade Cooking 
Fort Washington Ave. & 169th St. 



Como Pizza, Inc. 

Hot & Cold Heros 

We Deliver 4035 Broadway & 170 St. 

NICK and ANGELO 



KEEFE*KEEFE 

INCORPORATED 

429 EAST 75th STREET 
NEW YORK 21, NEW YORK 

YUkon 8-8800 

AMBULANCES 



Compliments of 

CARVEL 

Featuring 36 Home Made Ice Creams 

And Ice Cream Cakes For All Occasions 

1 T54 St. Nicholas Ara. opp. The Medical Center 





Manhattan Uniform Center 

4036 Broadway at 1 70 Street 
Medical Uniforms 
To Fit All Needs 

Telephone LO 8-9 1 30 



Jubilee Cleaners 

Broadway LO 8-9530 

Call & Deliver: No extra charge 

-7867 Take Out Service 



SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 Broadway, Comer 168th Sf. 



114 






Tfc.' 4 



■Vf V 



A 



/ 





Front Row: Kurtin, Sobol, Glenn. 

Back Row. Schurman, Brodie, Siegal, Branscom. 




1965 c y ear LoL Staff 



Samuel M. Sobol 
Michael L. Glenn 
H. Keith H. Brodie 
Stephen B. Kurtin 
James J. Branscom 
David J. Schurman 
Frederick P. Siegal 



Editor-in-Chief 
Associate Editor 
. \ssociate Editor 
Business Manager 
Assistant Editor 
Assistant Editor 
Assistant Editor 



116 



The Yearbook Staff wishes to express its thanks and appreciation to Mr. Emil 
Schmidt and the firm of Bradbury, Sayles, O'Neill. Hurley & Thomson, Inc.. 
Publishers, for their assistance and patience; to Mr. Barton and Mrs. Brown of the 
P & S Club for their many kindnesses; and to Miss Sarah Richison for her secretarial 
and moral support in the long twilight struggle. 










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